know all about menstruation

What is Menstruation? A Women Health Clinic Guide

Periods. What are they good for? Absolutely nothing! 

At least that’s how many women feel about menstruation. Menstruation can be a downright downer. If you’ve somehow managed to make it through with even the mildest menstrual symptoms, you’re still probably dealing with cramping, bloating, bleeding, and ruined underwear. 

A survey report by a renowned Women’s Health Clinic revealed that menstruation is uniquely mammalian and even within the class, only 10 species of primates, 4 species of bats, 1 species of spiny mouse, and the Elephant Shrew menstruate. 

It is said that most other mammals go through estrous, in which the uterine lining is reabsorbed rather than shed. 

Even more unique is that you’re a human, reading this, and you menstruate or know someone who does, and one thing that sets you apart from your mutually menstruating mammal friends is that you can comprehend the natural and necessary process of periods.

Once a woman reaches puberty, the transition from adolescence to adulthood, she’ll start menstruating. 

 

How Menstruation Cycle Works?

 

Menstruation is also referred to as a period, a visit from Aunt Flow, monthlies, menses, and “the curse”, among other things.  It’s generally characterized by bleeding from the vaginal opening. It’s not all blood though, it’s also mucosal tissue. 

Specifically, it’s the unused endometrial lining, the endometrium, of the uterus. The uterus is a pear-shaped reproductive organ in the lower abdomen of women. It’s located above the vagina and is connected to the ovaries via fallopian tubes. The ovaries are two glands that produce va (eggs), each located on either side of the uterus. They’re also responsible for the production of the hormones, progesterone, and estrogen.

 

Duration Of Menstruation Cycle

 

Menstrual cycles vary from woman to woman but on average last 28 days. While menstruation itself lasts anywhere from 1-7 days. The rise and fall of hormones dictate the menstrual cycle. There are two major phases of the cycle, each lasting about 14 days: the follicular phase, and the luteal phase. 

During the follicular phase, which begins on the first day of menstruation, the follicle-stimulating hormone starts the process of ova development. This means that even while you’re cursing a leaky pad to the depths of a bathroom trash can, your ovaries already have next month’s menses in mind. 

An ovum will develop in one of the two ovaries, and estrogen cues the endometrial lining of the uterus to thicken and become enriched with blood. After approximately two weeks of uterus preparation and ovum development, ovulation occurs. 

Ovulation is when the ovum travels from the ovary, where it was developed, into the fallopian tube, and comes to rest in a portion of the tube called the ampullary-isthmic junction. Here the ovum awaits fertilization via insemination; the introduction of semen into a woman’s uterus by way of the vagina.

Ovulation signals the end of the follicular phase and beginning of the luteal phase. While the ovum awaits fertilization, it’s sustained by the supply of blood to the uterus. Meanwhile, the ovary that sent the ovum, also sends a care package in the form of progesterone. 

 

Hormone That Is Responsible For Menstruation

 

This hormone is produced from the same follicle where the ovum developed by a temporary structure called the corpus luteum. Progesterone signals the endometrial lining to stop thickening and is also necessary for embryonic development.

The ovaries ensure that the uterus is bathed in it during the beginning of the luteal phase in the off chance fertilization. The ovum will descend into the uterus and, if fertilized, will implant itself into the thickened endometrium.

 However, more often than not, the ovum is not fertilized and around day 21 of your cycle, that same progesterone will peak then begin to drop off. This kicks off the process of menstruation. The endometrial tissue breaks down and the cramping begins. 

Cramping aids the uterus in detaching the tissues which, along with the accompanying blood, flow out of the vagina and ruin your favorite pair of khakis. Menstruation signals the end of the luteal phase and ushers in the follicular phase once again. 

An ovum begins development when your period begins and in true, out with the old, in with the new, fashion, the endometrium starts to thicken as soon as you trashed your last tampon.


Average Volume of Menstrual Fluid

 

The average volume of menstrual fluid discharged is between 2.5 to 4.5 tablespoons. That’s approximately ¼ cups of panty wasting period blood. 54% of women surveyed in a pool of 36,000 say they’ve ruined every pair of underwear they own thanks to Aunt Flow and her hygiene hijinks. 

You can fight her though, menstrual management comes in many forms and each woman finds her own preferred method. 

Disposable pads and tampons are the most common but menstrual cups and reusable pads are making a strong comeback in today’s more eco-conscious environment. No matter what you choose to use, know that even if you picked the wrong sanitary napkin this month, the menstrual cycle will give you another crack at it next month, and the next month, and probably the next month, because it’s a cycle that lasts from puberty to menopause.

If you have questions or concerns about your period, you should talk to your healthcare provider. Her Smart Choice is a reputed women health clinic and offers free, comfortable and confidential consultations. Our doctors are experts on women’s healthcare and are here to provide you with the best clinical care options that suit your needs. 

Please don’t hesitate to reach out and make an appointment or call our 24/7 answering service. Your peace of mind is important to us.


How To Differentiate A Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One?

How To Differentiate A Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘How To Differentiate A Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One?’

 

Preventive health visits should begin during adolescence to start a dialogue and establish an environment where a young patient can feel good about taking responsibility for her own reproductive health and feel confident that her concerns will be addressed in a confidential setting . 

 

Because menarche is such an important milestone in physical development, clinicians should educate adolescent girls and their parents or guardians about what to expect of a first menstrual period and the range for normal cycle length of subsequent menses.

 

Young girls and their parents or guardians frequently have difficulty assessing what constitutes normal menstrual cycles or patterns of bleeding. By age 15 (years old), 98% of females will have had menarche. Although menstrual cycles vary considerably during the first few years after menarche, the majority of cycles in adolescents last 21 to 45 days with two to seven days of menstrual bleeding. By the third postmenarchal year, 95 percent of cycles fall into this range. The average adult menstrual cycle lasts 28 to 35 days with four (4) to six (6) days of menstrual bleeding.

 

Adolescents with regular menses have cyclic estrogen secretion that permits orderly growth and shedding of the endometrium (estrogen-withdrawal bleeding), even in the absence of ovulation. 

 

In addition, the secretion of progesterone associated with the occasional ovulatory cycle in adolescents with regular menses helps to stabilize endometrial growth and permits more complete shedding.

 

 

Now let’s talk about Abnormal Uterine Bleeding. What is it and why does it happen?

A number of medical conditions can cause abnormal uterine bleeding, characterized by unpredictable timing and variable amount of flow. Although a long interval between cycles is common in adolescence due to anovulation, it is statistically uncommon for girls and adolescents to remain amenorrheic for more than 3 months (90 days).

 

Abnormal Uterine Bleeding (AUB) may be caused by ovulatory dysfunction and bleeding patterns can range from amenorrhea to irregular heavy menstrual bleeding.

 

The most common cause of AUB in adolescents during the initial one to two years of menstruation are anovulatory cycles (no ovulation), which are related to immaturity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. 

How To Differentiate A Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One?

Other common causes of AUB in adolescents include:

  • Pregnancy – pregnancy-related problems.
  • Bleeding disorders.
  • Polycystic ovary syndrome.
  • Thyroid dysfunction.
  • Hypothalamic dysfunction (eg, related to stress, exercise, underweight, acute weight loss, or obesity).
  • Hormonal or intrauterine contraception.
  • Infection. 

 

More than one cause may contribute or exacerbate AUB in a given adolescent.

 

  1. What is considered excessive menstrual bleeding? Excessive menstrual bleeding may be prolonged (greater than 7 days) or of increased volume (greater than 80 mL/cycle). Because neither patients nor clinicians can accurately estimate the volume of blood loss, excessive menstrual bleeding is often defined clinically (eg;  soaks a pad or tampon more than every two hours; interferes with activities (eg; wakes from sleep); and/or interferes with physical, emotional, social, and/or material quality of life). 
  2. What is the origin of bleeding? Excessive bleeding is typically from the uterus, whereas light bleeding, staining, or spotting may be from any site along the genital tract. Postcoital bleeding suggests bleeding from the cervix or other lower genital tract source. Bleeding that occurs solely with urination or defecation suggests a urinary or gastrointestinal source.
  3. What might it be associated with? Heavy menstrual bleeding, commonly associated with anovulation, also has been associated with the diagnosis of a coagulopathy (including von Willebrand’s disease, platelet function disorders, and/or other bleeding disorders) or other serious problems (including hepatic failure) and, rarely, malignancy.

 

To chart your menses may be beneficial, especially if your menstrual history is too vague or considered to be inaccurate.

 

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com. 

 

Get SOCIAL with us!

 

Her Smart Choice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Ch♀ice.

 

Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One? Normal Menstrual Cycle From An Abnormal One?

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #period #menstrualcycle  #yourbody #obgyn #gynecology #womenshealth #obstetrics  #gynecologist #doctor #ovulation #trackyourperiod #hormones #menstrualbleeding #hormonalchanges #irregularperiods #menses #BodyCare #AuntFlow #LadyBusiness  #LadyTime #machzorchodeshi #myuterushurts #cramps #moodchanges #abnormalmenstrualcycle #pos #polycysticovarysyndrome #excessivemenstrualbleeding #menstrualbleeding #aub #hypothalamicdysfunction


Category: PeriodPost Date: January 9, 2020

Why Do Women Get Periods Or Menstrual Cycles?

Why Do Women Get Periods or Menstrual Cycles?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘Why Do Women Get Periods Or Menstrual Cycles?’ 

 

Do you know when your last menstrual period began or how long it lasted? If not, it might be time to start paying attention. Periods or Menstrual Cycles

 

Tracking your menstrual cycles can help you understand what’s normal for you, time ovulation and identify important changes, such as a missed periods or unpredictable menstrual bleeding. 

 

The menstrual cycle is the monthly series of changes a woman’s body goes through in preparation for the possibility of pregnancy. Each month, one of the ovaries releases an egg, a process called ovulation. At the same time, hormonal changes prepare the uterus for pregnancy. 

 

 

If ovulation takes place and the egg isn’t fertilized, the lining of the uterus sheds through the vagina. This is a menstrual period.

 

The normal menstrual cycle is a tightly coordinated cycle of stimulatory and inhibitory effects that results in the release of a single mature oocyte from a pool of hundreds of thousands of primordial oocytes. Despite variations worldwide and within the U.S. population, median age at menarche has remained relatively stable, between 12 and 13 years, across well-nourished populations in developed countries. 

 

A variety of factors contribute to the regulation of this process, including hormones and paracrine and autocrine factors that are still being identified. 

 

The average adult menstrual cycle lasts 28 to 35 days, with approximately 14 to 21 days in the follicular phase and 14 days in the luteal phase.

Why Do Women Get Periods Or Menstrual Cycles?

Why Do Women Get Periods Or Menstrual Cycles?

 

There is relatively little cycle variability among women between the ages of 20 and 40 years. 

In comparison, there is significantly more cycle variability for the first five to seven years after menarche and for the last 10 years before cessation of menses.

Your menstrual cycle might be regular, about the same length every month,  or somewhat irregular, and your period might be light or heavy, painful or pain-free, long or short, and still be considered normal.

 

Within a broad range, “normal” is what’s normal for you. To find out what’s normal for you, start keeping a record of your menstrual cycle on a calendar or your smartphone.

 

To schedule an appointment, please Click Here.

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com. 

Get SOCIAL with us!

 

Her Smart Choice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Ch♀ice.

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #period #menstrualcycle  #yourbody #obgyn #gynecology #womenshealth #obstetrics  #gynecologist #doctor #ovulation #trackyourperiod #hormones #menstrualbleeding #hormonalchanges #irregularperiods #menses #BodyCare #AuntFlow #LadyBusiness #timeofthemonth #ontherag #RedTide #RedRiver #RedSea #RedMoon #CodeRed #MonthlyVisitor #MotherNature #LadyTime #CrimsonWave #CrimsonTide #BloodyMary #TheBlob #Sharkweek #ineedsomeicecream #cramps #machzorchodesi #muchodolor #moodchanges #dolor


Category: Menstrual Cycle, PeriodPost Date: December 31, 2019
Call Now Button
Safe Convenient Affordable Abortion Pills from Her Smart Choice, women's health center abortionabortion provider abortion pillsbirth controlfamily planning servicesGynecological ServicesUrogynecologyInfertilitypap teststd testingIUDSsurgical abortionMedication abortionwomen's health clinicabortion provider Her Smart Choice - Abortion Clinic and Gynecologist in Greater Los Angeles $50 - 1200 Price Range: $$$ 213-344-0267 2226 E Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles Her Smart Choice - Abortion Clinic and Gynecologist in Greater Los Angeles
2226 E Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 213-344-0267 213-372-0307
icon Abortion medical abortionabortion consultationabortion - unwanted pregnancyabortion care
2226 E Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 213-344-0267 213-372-0307
abortionabortion provider abortion pillsbirth controlfamily planning servicesGynecological ServicesUrogynecologyInfertilitypap teststd testingIUDSsurgical abortionMedication abortionwomen's health clinicabortion providerObstetrician & Gynecologist
Dr. Vikra Kothandaraman(866)392-1853 doctor.com/Dr-Vikram-Kothandaraman

Phone: (866)392-1853

2226 E Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90033 866-392-1853 866-392-1853
2226 E Cesar Chavez Avenue, Los Angeles 866-392-1853 $75 - 1500 Price Range: $$$ $150.00 physician doctor