cost of abortion

The Cost of Abortion in California

When it comes to the cost of an abortion in California, there are often many factors to consider. Depending on the kind of procedure you select and whether or not you have insurance, this can have a significant impact on your out-of-pocket expenses for the process. 

 

It is also important to note that different clinics may charge different amounts for an abortion procedure, so it is wise to shop around for the best deal available.

 

However, here is a general overview of abortion costs in California.

 

  • Abortion Pill Cost: Around $700

Medication abortion, also known as the abortion pill, can be taken up to 7 to 10 weeks pregnant. Most abortion clinics charge $700 to provide abortion pills.

 

  • Suction Abortion Cost: Around $750

Suction aspiration is also called suction curettage, or vacuum aspiration abortion. This abortion procedure is performed between 5 to 12 weeks of pregnancy. The estimated cost for this type of abortion in California is $750.

 

  • D&E Abortion Cost: Around $1,070-$3,050

This type of abortion is performed between 9-20 weeks of pregnancy. The typical cost for this type of abortion procedure in California is between $1,000-$3,000 or more.

 

If you are considering undergoing an abortion in California, taking the time to research which women’s health clinic offers the most affordable fees can be beneficial in helping you manage these potential costs.

 

How to Find an Affordable Abortion Clinic?

 

  • Do Your Research

Before committing to an abortion procedure, it is important to understand all of your options and the different costs associated with each.

 

California residents should research the fees associated with their chosen method in order to properly plan ahead and be aware of any financial burden they may incur as a result of an abortion. 

 

  • Know The Expenses

While costs vary depending on factors like location, type of clinic, and timing of the procedure, knowing the expenses before you begin can save you stress down the line. 

 

It is also important to familiarize yourself with the different payment plans your clinic may offer for those who may require monetary assistance or want more flexibility with how they pay for the process.

 

Researching your options gives you the power to make an informed decision that fits your individual needs and circumstances, making sure that you’re equipped with all the knowledge needed for a successful decision.

 

Find the Resources

 

There are many resources available to help you make an informed decision about whether or not to have an abortion.

 

Fortunately for those living in California, there are numerous resources available to help them better understand their options and the potential outcomes.

 

From counseling services to educational materials and support groups, individuals are better able to determine if they are making the right decisions regarding their lives and health.

 

No matter what someone chooses, having access to high-quality resources can make all the difference when it comes time to make a personal choice regarding not only abortion but many other important healthcare topics.



The cost should not be the only factor you consider when making this decision

abortion cost california

 

When making the personal decision to end a pregnancy, it is important to consider more than just the cost of an abortion in California. Although money likely plays a role when navigating this delicate decision, financial strain should not be the only factor you consider. 

 

  • Educating yourself on the potential risks, available support systems, and local ordinances should all be taken into account depending on your individual situation.

 

  • It is vital that any person considering an abortion make sure they are completely comfortable and informed about their choice, as it can have lasting effects both personally and medically in some cases.

 

  • If you decide to terminate, you should establish a plan for yourself that fits your specific needs and values.

 

You deserve to make the choice that is best for you.

 

It can be difficult to make decisions about our bodies, especially when it comes to abortion. Unfortunately, the decision doesn’t come free of judgment from others, but that doesn’t mean you have to face this alone.

 

In California, the cost of an abortion will vary depending on a number of factors, including the type of procedure and your health insurance provider, so it’s important for you to research your options and know what is available to you.

 

Whatever decision you make regarding abortion should be respected and honored as something that is best for you. It is critical to create a safe environment for yourself so that you can make the best decision for your body without feeling judged by society or those around you.

Ultimately, you deserve to make the choice that is best for you.

 

 

 


Covid-19 vaccines impact women's periods

COVID Vaccines – Can It Impact Women’s Periods?

Since the release of the COVID-19 vaccine, there have been many reports of people experiencing changes in their body. One unusual side effect that has been widely reported is changes to women’s periods. 

 

Two new studies have found that the vaccines do indeed change women’s periods, although the exact extent of these changes is still unknown. 

 

Whether or not this is a cause for concern remains to be seen, but it is definitely something worth keeping an eye on.

 

The studies found that the vaccines did not change women’s menstrual cycles

 

The results of recent studies suggest that vaccines for human papillomavirus (HPV) were unable to alter women’s menstrual cycles in any significant way. This is important news, because it has long been a concern among those who questioned the safety of these vaccines due to potential side effects. 

 

This new information proves that women can receive the necessary treatments without experiencing major shifts in their usual cycle and hormones. 

 

Scientists involved with the study have now become advocates for widespread HPV vaccination, believing it will not only help guard against development of certain cancers, but also provide peace of mind to potential recipients.

 

However, some women did report changes in their periods after getting vaccinated

 

Despite the fact that most women do not experience any changes to their periods after getting vaccinated, a small number of women have reported having longer or shorter periods than normal, experiencing more cramps, or even heavy bleeding. 

 

It is important for women to be aware of the potential for subtle shifts in the timing and intensity of their menstrual cycles when they get vaccinated. While it might sound scary, there is no evidence that these changes are anything more than temporary and should pass within a few months. 

 

Women should still talk to their nearby women’s health clinic if they are concerned about the changes they notice in order to ensure they have all the information they need.

 

These changes were mostly temporary & resolved within a few days or weeks

 

We all know that change is inevitable, especially with the current Covid wave constantly in flux. 

 

Recently, the world was rocked by some drastic changes that had wide-ranging impacts on multiple aspects of our lives especially to women, but thankfully side effects in women body due to Covid vaccine were mostly temporary and were resolved within a few days or weeks. 

 

It is unclear why the vaccines might cause changes in some women’s periods

 

Despite the advancements in medical research, it remains an unanswered mystery as to why vaccines might be responsible for changes to a woman’s period. Some reports suggest that vaccines may be triggering irregularities, including missed or early periods, although there is as yet no solid proof to back this up. 

 

A deeper understanding of how vaccines interact with female hormones may shed some light on this phenomenon, although until then many women will just have to rely on their own observations and experiences. 

 

All the same, these reports should remind us to stay keenly aware of any potential side effects that we might experience after receiving a vaccine – no matter how difficult they may be to explain.

 

More research is needed to understand this possible side effect of the vaccine

 

It is important to understand the risks associated with any vaccine, and this brings up an interesting question. Is the new COVID-19 vaccine more likely than other vaccines to cause a serious side effect? Recent studies suggest that this may be possible and more research is needed to understand better how the vaccine affects women menstrual cycle.

 

In order to make sure the benefits of vaccinating outweigh the potential risks, it is essential for health experts and policymakers to have a complete picture of what could possibly happen when individuals become vaccinated.

 

Acknowledging any potential common side effects or rare complications will help ensure that individuals are informed about all their options before making decisions about whether or not to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

 

Final Verdict

 

Every woman needs to take into account their own risk factors and health history. Although the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were studied in large clinical trials, not much is known about how they may impact the menstrual cycle for women who receive them.  

 

While some women did report changes in their periods after getting vaccinated, these shifts were mostly temporary and resolved within a few days or weeks. At this point, we are unsure why the vaccines might cause changes in some women’s periods. 

 

In any case, it is best to listen to what your body is telling you after receiving the vaccination—your doctor can help assess whether any symptoms might be linked to the vaccine or something else entirely. 

 

No one should have to choose between their health and protecting themselves from COVID-19—so it’s important that further research is conducted on how receiving a vaccine might affect menstruation cycles now and in the long run.

 

For more information new can reach us at hersmartchoice@elitehour.com or call 213-344-0267.

 


What is STD

What Does STD Mean?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘What Does STD Mean?’

What Does STD Mean? – It’s a sexually transmitted disease.
If you have sex, oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse and or genital touching, you can get an STD, also called a sexually transmitted infection (STI).
You’re straight or gay, married or single, and vulnerable to STIs symptoms.
Thinking or hoping your partner doesn’t have an STI is no protection; you need to know.

 

What are the causes of STDs?
The causes of STDs are viral or bacterial infections. STDs that are caused due to bacterial infections are treated using antibiotics.
There is no cure for STDs caused by viral infections, but you can take measures to treat std symptoms.

What factors increase your risk of contracting an STD?
The below-mentioned factors can increase your risk of contracting an STD:
⚹ Having sex with greater than one partner
⚹ Having a sexual partner who themselves has sex with greater than one partner either currently or in the past
⚹ Having sex with a person who has an STD or STI
⚹ Having a personal history of STDs/STIs
⚹ Using intravenous drugs or if your partner uses intravenous drugs

What are the most commonly occurring STDs?
Some of the commonly occurring STDs are:
⚹ Chlamydia
⚹ Genital herpes
⚹ Gonorrhea
⚹ HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection
⚹ Syphilis
⚹ HPV (human papillomavirus) infection
⚹ Hepatitis B
⚹ Trichomoniasis

How can you prevent STDs?
The following are the top five methods to prevent STDs:

Abstinence
Abstaining from having all types of sexual contact, i.e., vaginal, oral, or anal, is the most efficient and reliable method to avoid contracting an STD. However, most individuals don’t find abstinence a practical way of dealing with the situation.

Vaccination
Getting a vaccine is a safe and effective method recommended to prevent HPV and hepatitis B. The HPV vaccine for both females and males may protect against certain common forms of HPV. It is recommended that you get all three shots (doses) before engaging in sexual activity. However, an HPV vaccine is recommended for all teen girls and females after the age of 26 and all teen boys and males after the age of 21 who were not given the three shots or doses of HPV vaccine before (at a younger age). You must also get a hepatitis B vaccine if you have not received the vaccine before (at a younger age).

Reduce the number of your sex partners
Reducing the number of sex partners can also decrease contracting an STD. It is also essential to know about the sexual history of your partner. The more significant number of partners you have, the greater your risk of getting an STD. The same is also true for your sexual partners, i.e., if they have more partners, it still increases your risk. You and your sexual partner should get tested for STDs. Moreover, both of you should share the results of your tests with each other.

Mutual monogamy
The meaning of mutual monogamy is that you have agreed to have sex with only one individual who has also decided to have sex with you. Having a long-term relationship that is mutually monogamous is among the most effective and reliable methods to prevent STDs.

Use condoms
Using male condoms made of latex correctly and consistently is incredibly effective in reducing the transmission of STDs. You must use a latex condom each time you are involved in vaginal, oral, or anal sex. You can also use a female condom while having vaginal intercourse. You should use dental dams or condoms while having oral sex and gloves during manual penetration.

In case of using a lubricant, be sure to use a water-based lubricant. It is essential to use condoms during the entire sexual act. Though condoms aren’t 100% effective in preventing STDs, they are still highly effective.

 

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com or call
323-250-9360

Get SOCIAL with us!

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Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Choice.

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #stis #stds #sti #std #gonorrhea #chlamydia #gonorrhea #syphilis #trichomoniasis #gynecology #medicine #womenshealth #obstetrics #obgyn #medical #gynecologist


What Does STD Mean?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘What Does STD Mean?’

What Does STD Mean? – It’s sexually transmitted disease.
If you have sex, oral, anal, or vaginal intercourse and or genital touching, you can get an STD, also called a sexually transmitted infection (STI).
You’re straight or gay, married or single, and vulnerable to STIs symptoms.
Thinking or hoping your partner doesn’t have an STI is no protection; you need to know.

 

What are the causes of STDs?
The causes of STDs are viral or bacterial infections. STDs that are caused due to bacterial infections are treated using antibiotics.
There is no cure for STDs caused by viral infections, but you can take measures to treat their symptoms.

What factors increase your risk of contracting an STD?
The below-mentioned factors can increase your risk of contracting an STD:
⚹ Having sex with greater than one partner
⚹ Having a sexual partner who themselves has sex with greater than one partner either currently or in the past
⚹ Having sex with a person who has an STD or STI
⚹ Having a personal history of STDs/STIs
⚹ Using intravenous drugs or if your partner uses intravenous drugs

What are the most commonly occurring STDs?
Some of the commonly occurring STDs are:
⚹ Chlamydia
⚹ Genital herpes
⚹ Gonorrhea
⚹ HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) infection
⚹ Syphilis
⚹ HPV (human papillomavirus) infection
⚹ Hepatitis B
⚹ Trichomoniasis

How can you prevent STDs?
The following are the top five methods to prevent STDs:

Abstinence
Abstaining from having all types of sexual contact, i.e., vaginal, oral, or anal, is the most efficient and reliable method to avoid contracting an STD. However, most individuals don’t find abstinence a practical way of dealing with the situation.

Vaccination
Getting a vaccine is a safe and effective method recommended to prevent HPV and hepatitis B. The HPV vaccine for both females and males may protect against certain common forms of HPV. It is recommended that you get all three shots (doses) before engaging in sexual activity. However, an HPV vaccine is recommended for all teen girls and females after the age of 26 and all teen boys and males after the age of 21 who were not given the three shots or doses of HPV vaccine before (at a younger age). You must also get a hepatitis B vaccine if you have not received the vaccine before (at a younger age).

Reduce the number of your sex partners
Reducing the number of sex partners can also decrease contracting an STD. It is also essential to know about the sexual history of your partner. The more significant number of partners you have, the greater your risk of getting an STD. The same is also true for your sexual partners, i.e., if they have more partners, it still increases your risk. You and your sexual partner should get tested for STDs. Moreover, both of you should share the results of your tests with each other.

Mutual monogamy
The meaning of mutual monogamy is that you have agreed to have sex with only one individual who has also decided to have sex with you. Having a long-term relationship that is mutually monogamous is among the most effective and reliable methods to prevent STDs.

Use condoms
Using male condoms made of latex correctly and consistently is incredibly effective in reducing the transmission of STDs. You must use a latex condom each time you are involved in vaginal, oral, or anal sex. You can also use a female condom while having vaginal intercourse. You should use dental dams or condoms while having oral sex and gloves during manual penetration.

In case of using a lubricant, be sure to use a water-based lubricant. It is essential to use condoms during the entire sexual act. Though condoms aren’t 100% effective in preventing STDs, they are still highly effective.

 

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com or call
323-250-9360

Get SOCIAL with us!

Her Smart Choice 
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Choice.

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #stis #stds #sti #std #gonorrhea #chlamydia #gonorrhea #syphilis #trichomoniasis #gynecology #medicine #womenshealth #obstetrics #obgyn #medical #gynecologist

 


Category: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, STD, SyphilisPost Date: December 12, 2019

How To Choose A Birth Control Method That’s Right For You

Considering A Birth Control Option?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents
‘How To Choose A Birth Control Method For That’s Right For You’

 

If you hope to start a family soon, you’ll want a method that you can quickly stop when you’re ready, such as birth control pills or condoms. On the other hand, if you’re not thinking about having kids soon, long-lasting and reversible options, like an intrauterine device (IUD) implanted in your uterus or a birth control implant in your arm, may be more convenient.

These methods can last for several years before you have to replace them. If you’re sure you don’t want kids, you may decide on a permanent form of birth control; you can have a tubal ligation. You might hear this called GETTING YOUR TUBES TIED.

 

 

Birth control comes in many different forms. Pick a method that you are most likely to use correctly. You’ll have to remember to take them every day simultaneously with birth control pills. The patch you’ll need to change every week. With condoms, you’ve got to have them on hand and use them correctly. You have to place spermicide in your vagina no more than 1 hour before sex, and it has to stay there for as many as 8 hours after. You won’t have to interact with other methods as much. They leave less room for user error. But they are longer-lasting and tend to require a doctor’s office visit. Think about how each method suits your comfort level and lifestyle.

Birth control comes in many different forms. Pick a method that you are most likely to use correctly. You’ll have to remember to take them every day simultaneously with birth control pills. The patch you’ll need to change every week. With condoms, you’ve got to have them on hand and use them correctly. You have to place spermicide in your vagina no more than 1 hour before sex, and it has to stay there for as many as 8 hours after. You won’t have to interact with other methods as much. They leave less room for user error. But they are longer-lasting and tend to require a doctor’s office visit. Think about how each method suits your comfort level and lifestyle.

Protection Against STIs – Sexually Transmitted Infections Condoms are the only type of birth control that can protect against STIs. If this is a concern for you and your partner, you’ll need to use a new one each time you have sex, whether or not you use another form of birth control.

Menstrual Periods & Side Effects and Safety Some types of birth control come with an added perk. They stop or significantly reduce menstrual flow. If this is an essential feature for you, ask your doctor which methods bring this benefit. Some types of birth control have side effects or put you at risk for certain health conditions. Some forms may not be safe for people who have a specific health condition or take a particular medication. Your doctor can explain which methods would be least likely to cause unwanted side effects and which would be safest for you, based on your health and any problems that run in your family.

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com or call 323-250-9360

Get SOCIAL with us!

 

Her Smart Choice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Choice.

 

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #yourdecision #iud #nexplanon #implants #birthcontrol

 

 

 


Category: Birth Control, IUDS, NexplanonPost Date: December 10, 2019

Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs?’ Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs?

 

More than 65 million Americans have an incurable STD. Each year, 20 million new cases are reported; half of these infections are among people ages 15 to 24 and they can have long-term consequences.

 

Why You Need To Get Tested For STDs

Why You Need To Get Tested For STDs

 

The risk of STDs/STIs is particularly high among sexually active adolescents and young adults. As an example, in the United States, the rate of reported cases of chlamydia among women are highest among ages 20 to 24, followed by ages 15 to 19. In 2018, the incidence of chlamydia in these age brackets was 4,064 and 3,306 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively, compared with the total incidence of 540 cases per 100,000 persons.

 

 

To Schedule an Appointment; Click Here

 

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com or call 323-250-9360.

Get SOCIAL with us!

 

Her Smart Choice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Ch♀ice.

 

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #yourdecision #stds #stis #chlamydia #gonorrhea #syphilis #trichomoniasis Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs? Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs?’ Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs? More than 65 million Americans have an incurable STD. Each year, 20 million new cases are reported; half of these infections are among people ages 15 to 24 and they can have long-term consequences. The risk of STDs/STIs is particularly high among sexually active adolescents and young adults. As an example, in the United States, the rate of reported cases of chlamydia among women are highest among ages 20 to 24, followed by ages 15 to 19. In 2018, the incidence of chlamydia in these age brackets was 4,064 and 3,306 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively, compared with the total incidence of 540 cases per 100,000 persons. Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs? Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs?’ Why Do You Need to Get Tested For STDs? More than 65 million Americans have an incurable STD. Each year, 20 million new cases are reported; half of these infections are among people ages 15 to 24 and they can have long-term consequences. The risk of STDs/STIs is particularly high among sexually active adolescents and young adults. As an example, in the United States, the rate of reported cases of chlamydia among women are highest among ages 20 to 24, followed by ages 15 to 19. In 2018, the incidence of chlamydia in these age brackets was 4,064 and 3,306 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively, compared with the total incidence of 540 cases per 100,000 persons. 

The risk of STDs/STIs is particularly high among sexually active adolescents and young adults. As an example, in the United States, the rate of reported cases of chlamydia among women are highest among ages 20 to 24, followed by ages 15 to 19. In 2018, the incidence of chlamydia in these age brackets was 4,064 and 3,306 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively, compared with the total incidence of 540 cases per 100,000 persons.
The risk of STDs/STIs is particularly high among sexually active adolescents and young adults. As an example, in the United States, the rate of reported cases of chlamydia among women are highest among ages 20 to 24, followed by ages 15 to 19. In 2018, the incidence of chlamydia in these age brackets was 4,064 and 3,306 cases per 100,000 persons, respectively, compared with the total incidence of 540 cases per 100,000 persons.

 


Category: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, STD, SyphilisPost Date: December 9, 2019

How Do You Know You Have an STD?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘How Do You Know You Have an STD?’

Five (5) of the top ten (10) reportable diseases in the United States are STDs. Data from the CDC indicates that in 2017, in the United States, a combined total of more than 2.2 million new cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea, and syphilis were reported.

The global incidence of four curable sexually transmitted diseases (chlamydia, gonorrhea, syphilis, and trichomoniasis) is estimated at over 357 million cases. Many cases go undiagnosed and untreated.

Screening is an important approach to identify and treat infected individuals, who would otherwise go undetected. Risk assessment through routine sexual histories is important to appropriately target at-risk individuals for STI screening. This includes assessment for risk factors that place individuals at increased risk for STI, such as current or past history of STI or a history of multiple sex partners.

In addition to specific behavioral risk factors, demographic factors (“risk groups”) that are associated with high prevalence of STIs also be assessed.

For additional information, please visit www.HerSmartChoice.com or call 323-250-9360.

Get SOCIAL with us!

Her Smart Choice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Ch♀ice.

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #yourdecision #stds #stis #chlamydia #gonorrhea #syphilis #trichomoniasis

 


Category: Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, STD, SyphilisPost Date: December 6, 2019

How the Procedure of Inserting a Contraceptive Implant is Done?

Her Smart Choice Women’s Health Center Educational Series Presents ‘How the Procedure of Inserting a Contraceptive Implant is Done?’

The implant is a small, flexible rod – about the size of a matchstick – that’s inserted under the skin of your upper arm by your healthcare provider. It releases a hormone called progestin, which keeps your ovaries from releasing eggs. The implant helps prevent pregnancy for up to three years but can be removed sooner. Have you decided to proceed with this method of contraception, but want to learn more about the procedure itself?

Please either visit Her Smart Choice at www.HerSmartChoice.com or give us a call 818-697-6955.

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel, BLOG or Facebook Page (HerSmartChoice) or follow-us on Twitter (@4hersmartchoice) or Instagram (hersmartchoice) to be notified when our next educational episode is live and to see more videos like this one.

 

Her Smart Ch♀ice
Your Life. Your Decision. Your Smart Choice.

#hersmartchoice #hscmc #birthcontrol #yourdecision

 

 

The implant is a small, flexible rod – about the size of a matchstick – that’s inserted under the skin of your upper arm by your healthcare provider. It releases a hormone called progestin, which keeps your ovaries from releasing eggs. The implant helps prevent pregnancy for up to three years but can be removed sooner. Have you decided to proceed with this method of contraception, but want to learn more about the procedure itself?

Please either visit Her Smart Choice at www.HerSmartChoice.com or give us a call 818-697-6955.

Subscribe to our YouTube Channel, BLOG or Facebook Page (HerSmartChoice) or follow-us on Twitter (@4hersmartchoice) or Instagram (hersmartchoice) to be notified when our next educational episode is live and to see more videos like this one.

The implant is a small, flexible rod – about the size of a matchstick – that’s inserted under the skin of your upper arm by your healthcare provider. It releases a hormone called progestin, which keeps your ovaries from releasing eggs. The implant helps prevent pregnancy for up to three years but can be removed sooner. Have you decided to proceed with this method of contraception, but want to learn more about the procedure itself?

 

 


Category: Contraceptive Implant, NexplanonPost Date: December 4, 2019
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